Ocd Relationship

People in the environment may sometimes characterize you as a jealous person when you allow a partner OCD to overwhelm you – for example, if you are disturbed by your partner’s obsessive image with another person and share it with him or another. However, it is not jealousy that drives you to this way of thinking and the accompanying search for reassurance, but an inner feeling, that is, a partner OCD that constantly assures you that everything in your relationship is not as it should be. Jealousy, on the other hand, implies the existence of a real trigger – say, flirting with another person. The grief counselling toronto is the right place for you.

Similarly, the irrational fear that a relationship in which you have no future can be interpreted by the environment as seeking an excuse to break up. However, it is quite the opposite – this way, you are not looking for an excuse to break up, but for reassuring that your OCD partner is ‘wrong’ and that you need to be with the person you love.

Should I Break Up?

This is a very common question raised by the OCD partner. In this case, the need to break up should only be seen as a momentary impulse caused by obsessive thoughts that the relationship is not good enough, that the partner has too many flaws, that the feelings are not honest and mutual (for which there is no real evidence!). It should also be borne in mind that one of the typical misconceptions for OCD is selective attention – the focus is solely on the partner’s flaws and flaws, while the positives are ignored, negated, attributed to coincidences, and regularly monitored, what if ” questions.

The termination can also lead to marked intolerance of uncertainty (and the connection itself implies uncertainty, and it is necessary to reconcile with that fact). After a thorough analysis, the person decides that it is best to take that step to prevent a major catastrophe, such as being hurt by their partner, which will be unbearable for her, or hurting her partner if she realizes that her feelings are not truly sincere.

This question may also take the form of, “Do I have to break because my relationship is causing me high anxiety and obsessive thoughts?”. If the answers to the following questions are, “Would increase anxiety also exist in relation to another person / did you notice patterns of obsessive behavior in other segments of life or previous relationships / do you think the relationship would be stable if your anxiety were eliminated? ”, it is clear that a more adequate solution than termination would be to work on overcoming elevated anxiety and OCD partner.

Breaking up, in these cases, would also be a form of avoidance supported by the OCD partner, and if the person succumbed to their impulses and allowed them to be stronger than the rational part of the personality, one could say that they became the “slave” of their OCD.

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